Newsletter

Eastside Veterinary Associates - Medical Articles The veterinarians and staff at the Eastside Veterinary Associates are pleased to provide you with an online newsletter. This fun and fact-filled newsletter is updated on a regular basis.

Included in the newsletter are articles pertaining to pet care, information on our animal hospital, as well as news on the latest trends and discoveries in veterinary medicine.

Please enjoy the newsletter!

Current Newsletter Topics

Study Suggests Dog Ownership Reduces Asthma Risk

A new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences says that the presence of household dogs may help reduce the risk of asthma developing in children. Scientists found that exposing mice to dust from homes with dogs changed the composition of gut microbes significantly in the mice. The mice were then exposed to common allergens, and the findings show that mice that had been exposed to the dust from homes with dogs had fewer allergic reactions than mice exposed to dust from homes without.

According to Susan Lynch, an associate professor in the division of gastroenterology at the University of California and the senior author of the study, the presence of dogs in a home may allow the GI tract to be inoculated, and lead to a more mature immune response. The findings, she said, are consistent with previous research based on human observations, and are likely to apply to people. Dr. Lynch hopes the study could lead to the development of microbial based therapies to prevent asthma and other allergies.

VIDEO: Warming Weather May Bring Pesky Parasites

Most pet owners know that the return of springtime temperatures will also hasten the return of itching and scratching due to fleas. What many owners don't know is that besides the irritation, fleas can also spread numerous serious diseases and parasites such as tapeworms. Although fleas seem to hold an upper hand, your veterinarian can help you win the battle against these pests. Watch this video to learn more.


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Researches Warn Against Raw Meat Diets for Pets

A new study published in the Journal of American Veterinary Medical Association cautions pet owners against raw meat-based diets, saying that the diet may “lack nutritional balance and cause illness.” The study notes that, while many who feed their pets a raw meat-based diet believe it is a more natural option for cats and dogs, there are significant risks involved.

Researchers noted that raw meat-based diets often do not provide adequate nutrition for pets, and can carry food-borne illnesses, which have proved fatal in some cases. In one case, salmonella was found in 48% of raw meat-based diets. The researchers ultimately concluded that, in the case of raw meat-based diets, “the risks outweigh any minimal benefits.”

VIDEO: Modern Veterinary Anesthesia

Do you worry whenever your pet might need surgery? Of course you do...the Internet is full of all sorts of information about the dangers your beloved animal might face when under anesthesia. But, how true is that? Are pets dying every day while undergoing routine spays, neuters and other procedures? Watch this video to see the real story and understand how veterinarians and animal hospitals are working hard to make sure that your four legged friend's surgery goes smoothly and safely!

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TV for Dogs

Does Spot give you those same sad puppy eyes every morning that you leave for work?

DogTV may have just the trick. DogTV is the first cable network to deliver programming specifically designed for dogs, 24 hours a day. The shows typically consist of three to six minute programs of grassy fields, bouncing balls, or people rubbing down their dog’s bellies. Each of the shows are scientifically designed to appeal to the needs and senses of dogs, ultimately delivering images that provide similar levels of distraction and pleasure that we find in our own TV shows.

Can I have your attention?

Although there is still controversy on the true impact and effect of these doggy channels, the fact that many dogs are staying amused by the programming is enough to peak many pet owner’s interests. However, just as you wouldn’t raise your kids entirely in front of a TV screen, a similar line of thinking holds true for your dogs. Nothing can replace the quality care and time you give to Fido in the backyard, but DogTV may provide just the help you need for those sad morning moments.

Home is Where the Poison Is

March is Poison Prevention Awareness Month. Pet poisoning is a serious problem. Ingestion of harmful foods and chemicals is among the top reasons that pets require emergency care. However, with proper awareness and precautions, pet poisoning is preventable.



Delicious But Deadly: What You Need to Know

For your curious, non-discriminating pet, home offers a buffet of tempting but harmful treats. The biggest threats include:

Human medicine: Over-the-counter medications like acetaminophen (Tylenol) and ibuprofen (Advil), prescription medications (such as heart medications and anti-depressants), as well as dietary supplements

Flea and tick preventatives: Always follow recommended dosages and instructions and never use treatments intended for a dog on a cat. Exceeding recommended doses is dangerous and not the way to kill more fleas and ticks.

Human food: Chocolate, garlic, onions, grapes, raisins, macadamia nuts, the artificial sweetener xylitol (found in sugar-free gum), and avocados are toxic to pets.

Household cleaners and chemicals: paint, paint thinners, solvents, and pool chemicals (etc.!)

Plants: According to the Pet Poison Helpline, the most common poisonous household plants are the autumn crocus, azalea, cyclamen, kalanchoe, lilies, oleander, dieffenbachia, daffodils, lily of the valley, sago palm, tulips, and hyacinths. And don’t forget about poinsettias, mistletoe, and holly during the holidays!

Rodenticides: Use with extreme caution; they are engineered to be appetizing. The most common type uses an anticoagulant which causes internal bleeding and death.

Pest control baits and insecticides: Though less harmful than rodenticides, bait containers themselves post a risk if ingested.

Lawn and garden chemicals: Allow for proper drying time (up to 48 hours) in the area before giving pets access to treated areas and plants.

Antifreeze: Antifreeze is very sweet and attractive to dogs. There is an antidote but it must be given shortly after ingestion, so if you suspect ingestion seek veterinary attention immediately.

What You Can Do: Pet-Proofing Prevents Problems

Keep cleaners and other harmful chemicals in a secure, or locked cabinet and clean up any spills immediately. Use organic alternatives whenever possible. Keep all medicine in a bathroom and if you are concerned about your pet gobbling a dropped pill, close the door before taking. Keep people food out of reach and remind all family members and guests not to feed your pets. Remember that a determined or bored pet can chew through containers, bottles, and even child-safe locks!


If you suspect that your pet has eaten something poisonous, act quickly! Contact your veterinarian, local emergency hospital, and/or the Pet Poison Helpline at 800-213-6680.

The Good and the Bad of Hepatitis C Discovery in Dogs

First, the bad news: Researchers have discovered a hepatitis C-like virus in dogs. Now, the good news: this discovery could lead to important new research and development on the causes of the virus in humans. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 200 million people are affected by hepatitis C worldwide, with over 3 million infections in the United States alone. New research reveals that our fury friends may be both the reason and the cure.

Hepatitis C

The discovery of the virus in dogs marks the first time a hepatitis-like infection has ever been detected in non-human primates. Such a discovery gives researchers hope that there is much more to be uncovered and understood about the evolution of the virus, and ultimately, its prevention and cure. The new studies also indicate that the virus could have been introduced to humans centuries ago through contact with dogs or other similar species. But don’t worry, there is currently no proof or risk that dogs can infect humans with the virus today – only that they could lead in the hepatitis discoveries of tomorrow.

Cats May Offer Clues for HIV Vaccine

Researchers in Jacksonville have discovered a link between feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) that may be a key to developing a vaccine for HIV. Janet Yamamoto, a professor of immunology at the University Of Florida College Of Veterinary Medicine, recently discovered a protein in the FIV virus triggers an immune response in blood from HIV-infected people.


Cats May Offer Clues for HIV Vaccine


Yamamoto, who discovered the first FIV vaccine in 2002, said that the possible HIV vaccine will need to be tested in two animals before it can be tested on humans; monkeys will likely be the next test subject. Provided animal testing goes well, the vaccine could be tested on humans within the next five years. “We can use those animals as a model,” Yamamoto explained, adding that monkeys and cats cannot transmit the disease to humans.